JeuDORIS d'Or Avril 2018

Comment citer cette question :
http://doris.ffessm.fr/Forum/JeuDORIS-d-Or-Avril-2018-33761

Réf : 33761

Vincent MARAN

Vincent MARAN le 09/04/18

Bonjour

Vous le savez : il faut varier les plaisirs...
Pas de photo de détail d'un animal cette fois-ci !

Vous reconnaîtrez facilement l'organisme marin qui est le sujet de cette photo, et à quel objet il est associé. Là n'est pas la question...

Par ailleurs, vous devinerez facilement que, s'il ne s'agissait que de décoration, je ne vous aurais pas proposé cette photo.

Donc : quel est l'intérêt précis de l'association "animal-objet" visible ici ?

Ce jeu est permis aux "Experts", comme aux "Amateurs" !

J'attendrai environ 24 h avant d'apporter une autre photo ou un premier commentaire.

Les règles de ce jeu se trouvent en lien ici
0

Olivier JULLIEN le 11/04/18

Quelques compléments en Anglais ...

This coral-handled spoon may have been part of a set, although it is impossible to tell whether it was just paired with a knife, or whether it was part of a larger cutlery set. A similar coral-handled spoon, together with a matching knife and fork, was purchased around 1579 by the Elector Augustus of Saxony, who had one of the largest-known collections of coral-handled cutlery. Coral was not only beautiful, it was also believed to have a range of protective properties, including the ability to ward off malignant magic. Its use in sixteenth-century cutlery shows not only the fashion for combining beautiful, natural materials with the goldsmith's skill to make a functional, domestic object, but also suggests persisting concerns about poisoned food, a danger which the presence of coral could avert. This particular spoon is decorated with an image of the goddess Diana, identifiable by the crescent moon she wears in her hair. Diana, the Classical goddess of the moon and of hunting, and her image here may refer to the owner's name or personal emblem. The coat of arms and initials on the back of the spoon bowl have been engraved at a later date, and suggest the spoon formed part of gifts commemorating a marriage.

Descriptive line

Spoon with a silver-gilt bowl and a handle formed from a branch of red coral, Germany, ca.1550-75

Physical description

Spoon with a silver-gilt bowl and a handle formed from a branch of red coral. The bowl of the spoon bears an unidentified shield of arms a coronet and initials. It is further decorated with elaborate scrolling patterns and the gilt bottom of the handle is decorated with classical heads in low relief. These heads represent, most probably the goddess Diana, since they have a crescent moon, her personal emblem, above them.

Historical context note

A very similar spoon exists as part of a set with a knife and fork, purchased around 1579 by the Elector Augustus of Saxony, who had one of the largest-known collections of coral-handled cutlery. This indicates that the present spoon may have originally formed part of a set. The Duke of Bavaria, Albrecht V, also bought carved and uncarved corals, including knives, forks and spoons. There appears to have been a lot of coral circulating around Europe at this time. Coral branches are listed in Venetian shop inventories of the second half of the 16th c. Main trading centres were especially Trapani and Genoa in Italy, but also Nuremberg and Augusta in Germany and the latter two are famous for their spectacular combinations of materials, such as coral with nautilus shells, mother of pearl or ostrich eggs. Coral, both carved and uncarved appears in Kunstkammer, from Francesco de’Medici’s studiolo, to that of the Elector of Saxony. In Ferdinando de’Medici’s

Tribuna, where he kept a whole collection of exotic and valuable objects, a 1642 inventory lists a spoon with a coral handle and rock crystal bowl.
Several examples of spoons with coral branch handles remain, a testament to the popularity of this type of object.

Prices when given in inventories are given in "v" and are as follows: A Messerbesteck (cutlery set) mit turkischen Messern, Loffeln und Peronen (i.e. eating forks) von lauter (pure) Corallen: 250 v. Item ein kleines Futteral (case) mit einer Figur, einem Messer, Loffel und Perronen mit corallinem Heft (handle): 25 v.

The question remains of whether they were ever actively used for dining purposes.
It is definitely the case that cutlery made of precious and unusual materials was often made for the wealthier classes. They demonstrated the culture, good taste and wealth of the owner, especially as he usually took his own cutlery with him when invited to dinner or travelling. Contemporary writers praise the use of cutlery made of precious materials: Giovanni Pontano in his De Splendore wrote in his section on ‘those furnishings which are appropriate to the splendid man' that: ‘The base man and the splendid man both use a knife at table. The difference between them is this. The knife of the first is sweaty and has a horn handle; the knife of the other man is polished and has a handle made of some noble material that has been worked with an artist’s mastery...and moreover it is appropriate for those of senatorial level and of the prince’s household to have a certain superiority, so that their goods should not be, merely polished and abundant but also rare and distinct.’ Later on in the same section he says: ‘Indeed, it is praiseworthy if along with the quantity and excellence of the furnishings, there is
a variety in the work, the artistry and the material of a series of objects of the same category.’

Tomas Coryat in 1608 also comments on the use of silver cutlery by the proper gentleman, rather than iron and poorer materials.
The Duchess of Cleves possessed, in 1566, eleven spoons made of porcelain, decorated with branches of coral, while knives with handles of agate and coral are mentioned within the accounts of the ‘menus plaisirs du roi’ in France. Albrecht V of Bavaria had so much cutlery decorated with coral, he refused to buy some more, when it was offered for sale. The sheer quantities involved indicate that it was not purely and exclusively decorative. I would suggest that it may also have been used on occasion, although the fragility and preciousness of the materials would have precluded frequent usage. That it may have been used on occasion, is backed up firstly by the fact that one of the cutlery sets offered to Albrecht V for purchase came in a little case – presumably a travelling case, and secondly by the presence of a coat of arms on the back of the spoon, that would have operated as an identifier to prevent loss. Giovanni Tescione, too, seems to think that coral cutlery was used. He says that it was especially in the table accoutrements of the great houses that coral, especially in its natural form as branches, was used.

Pascaline BODILIS
0

Pascaline BODILIS le 11/04/18

Bonjour,

Merci Vincent pour ce nouveau jeu DORIS toujours instructif.

Au début de mes recherches, effectivement j'avais trouvé cuillère à moelle d'où le côté culinaire ! Après j'ai trouvé des articles expliquant le lien avec le poison mais je ne connaissais pas le document du musée de Samadet. En tout cas c'était une belle énigme.

Bonne journée à tous.

Pascaline

Bruno CHANET
0

Bruno CHANET le 11/04/18

SUPER, Vincent

s'il te plait, un autre, un autre...

Claire BRUCY
0

Claire BRUCY le 10/04/18

Et le doc du musée...

  • Nom du photographe : Musée départemental de la faïence et des arts de la table Samadet - Dossier pédagogique 2016-2017
  • Agrandir l'image
<p>Et le doc du musée...</p>
Claire BRUCY
0

Claire BRUCY le 10/04/18

Les moteurs de recherche sont plein de ressources ! Happy

Ce genre d'ustensiles existait aussi en couteau et en fourchette visiblement (voir photo). Et un dossier pédagogique du musée Samadet (le même que celui donné par Vincent) nous en dit encore un peu plus sur tout ça.

Claire

  • Nom du photographe : http://chintz-of-darkness.blogspot.fr/2008/08/mad-tea-party.html
  • Agrandir l'image
<p>Les moteurs de recherche sont plein de ressources ! <img src="http://doris.ffessm.fr/extension/doris/design/doris/images/emoticones/smile.png" a...
Vincent MARAN
0

Vincent MARAN le 10/04/18

Bonsoir

C'est un sujet récurrent : trouver le bon niveau de difficulté pour un tel jeu !
Je ne connaissais pas cette propriété supposée du corail, et, avant de mettre la photo en ligne, j'ai mis dans un moteur de recherche quelques mots clés avec peu de succès, ce que j'ai considéré positivement pour le jeu ...

Bravo à Pascaline, qui a néanmoins trouvé très rapidement, après une réponse très gastronomique mais qui n'était pas attendue !
Pascaline a bien défendu l'honneur des experts Happy .

Sur la photo jointe vous trouverez les infos qui accompagnaient l'objet exposé.

Que dirais-je du reste...vous avez déliré sans limites, et vous avez bien eu raison, au moins ce jeu aura eu aussi ce mérite !

Merci à tous de votre participation.

A bientôt

Vincent

<p>Bonsoir</p><p>C'est un sujet récurrent : trouver le bon niveau de difficulté pour un tel jeu !<br>Je ne connaissais pas cette propriété supposée...
Michel GRARD
0

Michel GRARD le 10/04/18

Bruno a un peu raison, ça se corse !

mais avec la réponse d'Alain-Pierre, ça chauffe ! Je pense même qu'il brûle !

Dans ces conditions d'expériences avérées et la chaleur des Doridiens, je serais bien en peine de proposer mieux.

c'est comme si c'était cuit effectivement

à moins que Vincent ne nous en propose une cuillère supplémentaire, j'attends avec intérêt la solution proposée.

Cordialement

Michel

Alain-Pierre SITTLER
2

Alain-Pierre SITTLER le 10/04/18

Il s'agit en fait d'une mutation connue chez certains Octocoralliaires, dont la structure coenenchymiale peut se modifier énormément en fonction des écarts de températures saisonnières.
En règle générale, ces mutations de conditions de chaleurs passent inaperçues en milieu naturel, les écarts n'excédant pas une dizaine de degrés. Mais elles sont extrêmement plus spectaculaires dans des conditions d'expériences en laboratoire, lorsque la colonie est soumise à de forts gradients de chaleur de plusieurs centaines de degrés.
Sur cette image, du corail rouge cuit hier.

Bruno CHANET
0

Bruno CHANET le 10/04/18

Mais non !! vous n'y êtes pas

c'est un tuba pour très jeunes plongeurs: la partie cuillère va dans la bouche et les branches des coraux sont percés longitudinalement ! évident !!!

0

Michel Barrabes le 10/04/18

Corail pour corail, je propose celui des oursins, qui comme chacun le sait depuis Salvador Dali sont indispensables avant une création artistique

Donc une cuillère à oursins psychédélique

MB

Jacques COVES
0

Jacques COVES le 10/04/18

J'ai oublié de préciser que le chausse-pied/gratte-dos était tout à fait indiqué pour les palmes de pointure inférieure à celle du pied. Ceci est très pratique pour les palmes dont la longueur diminue l'hiver ou quand l'eau est froide ou quand on a oublié de se couper les ongles des orteils.

Bruno CHANET
0

Bruno CHANET le 10/04/18

encore en vente, ici

Bruno CHANET
0

Bruno CHANET le 10/04/18

Bonjour, je pense que l'essentiel a été dit sur les vertus accordées au corail rouge.

Associé ici à une cuillère en argent (non ?), le corail rouge est-il ici utilisé pour détecter un poison ou "potentialiser" le " pouvoir" de la substance à ingérer

Philippe BOURJON
0

Philippe BOURJON le 10/04/18

Le corail rouge était aussi censé être un talisman protégeant de la sorcellerie et de diverses entreprises du diable, mais ça ne doit pas concerner les cuillères...

Claire BRUCY
0

Claire BRUCY le 10/04/18

C'est Pascaline qui a raison : Au 17è siècle, sur les "grandes" tables (parce que rare et précieux), le corail rouge était utilisé pour "détecter" un éventuel empoisonnement : il devait "suer" abondamment ou changer de couleur à proximité d'un poison. D'autres objets de table pouvaient contenir du corail rouge, pour la même raison.

0

Christophe PRADEAU le 09/04/18

C'est une cuillère pour manger des lentilles corail. Le corail des coquilles Saint-Jacques se mange avec des fourchettes du même style.

0

Laurent TOULOUSE le 09/04/18

Bon ben comme Jacques, je propose quelque chose d'inédit.

quel est l'intérêt précis de l'association "animal-objet" visible ici ?

A pouvoir faire un jeu de mots pourri: du cORail...

désolé !

Jacques COVES
0

Jacques COVES le 09/04/18

Pascaline doit avoir raison, mais au cas où elle se tromperait, je suggère qu'il s'agit d'un chausse-pied associé à un gratte-dos. Le gratte-dos est en corail car le contact est plus doux quand les polypes sont de sortie.

Mais j'ai peut-être tout faux, cela va sans dire.

Pascaline BODILIS
0

Pascaline BODILIS le 09/04/18

En fait on croyait que le corail rouge était un antidote au poison.

Pascaline BODILIS
0

Pascaline BODILIS le 09/04/18

En fait ces cuiilères servaient à savoir si un plat était empoisonné ou non, le corail réagissant au poison.

Pascaline BODILIS
0

Pascaline BODILIS le 09/04/18

Bonsoir, Il s'agit d'une cuillère à moelle. La forme de la branche de corail permet de manger l'intérieur d'un os à moelle dans un plat comme l'osso-bucco. La cuillère servant elle à manger le plat.

Véronique LAMARE
0

Véronique LAMARE le 09/04/18

Est-ce que la petite cuillère vient de Corse ?

Nos partenaires